Ancient History

Shambhallah1What is Shambhallah?

In Tibetan Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Shambhala (Sanskrit: शम्भलः Śambhalaḥ, also spelled Shambala or Shamballa or “Shambhallah”; Tibetan: བདེ་འབྱུང, Wylie: bde ‘byung; Chinese: 香巴拉; pinyin: xiāngbālā) is a mythical kingdom. It is mentioned in various ancient texts, including the Kalachakra Tantra and the ancient Zhangzhung texts of western Tibet. The Bon scriptures speak of a closely related land called Tagzig Olmo Lung Rig. gYUNG-DRUNG BKOD-GLING…

The legends, teachings and healing practices associated with Shambhallah are older than any of these organized religions. Shambhallah may very well have been an indigenous belief system, an Alti-Hymalian shamanic tradition, absorbed into these other faiths. This pre-existing belief system, also called Mleccha (from Vedic Sanskrit म्लेच्छ mleccha, meaning “non-Vedic”), and the amazing abilities, wisdom and long life of these ‘sun worshipers’ (the Siddhi from the Vedic Sanskrit सिद्धि of the ancient ‘Surya Samadhi’ समाधि) is documented in both the Buddhist and Hindu texts. Whatever its historical basis, Shambhala (spelling derived from the Buddhist transliterations) gradually came to be seen as a Buddhist pure land, a fabulous kingdom whose reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic. It was in this form that the Shambhallah myth reached Western Europe and the Americas, where it influenced non-Buddhist as well as Buddhist spiritual seekers — and, to some extent, popular culture in general.

This is a brief explanation of a very complex subject. Please note our spelling difference Sham-bha-lal-lah… It is a long word spoken with much resonance and breath. A great chanting/ meditation word. Very powerful; very sacred. Careful what you wish for whilst doing this!

Hindu texts such as the Vishnu Purana (4.24) mention the village Shambhala as the birthplace of Kalki, the final incarnation of Vishnu who will usher in a new Golden Age (Satya Yuga). It gives us hints of the indo-european roots of many sacred words. It states that a man named:

“Shamba, left the royal residence of Dvaravati on the edge of the salt sea and journeyed to the Candrabhaga River in the Panjab, to the sacred bathing place of Mitravana, named for Mitra, one of the twelve Adityas. Until this time the Sun God had been worshipped by means of holy circles (mandala). Samba invited eighteen families of the Magas (Magi) of Sakadvipa to Mitravana where he established for them the city of Shambapura. (The site of Shambapura is the present day Multan…Mulasthana)…(Acta: 1978…pg 239)…

Exercises for adoration of the sun and accumulation of its energy, friendship and wisdom are central to the teachings of Shambhallah.

The Mithras sect of 1st century Rome appears to have arisen from this tradition.

“At the pleasant bank of the Candrabhaga, a city named for Sambha is situated…There lies the abode of the Sun God (Arka) who is standing there in the form of Mitra with the Mitra eye.” (Humbach: 1978..pg 236)….

Mithras was the Eye of the universe embodied as the Sun

“This is evidently the region of Mithras, the Persian God of Light, whose cult later penetrated into Tibet as the Bon religion.” (Kuznetsov: 1970..pg 571)

In the Indo-Iranian countries in which the swastika, the symbol of the sun, originated the swastika represented the sun with its arms extended counter-clockwise and clockwise. Until the year 1400 BC, the Iranians and Hindus were still united and had several gods with similar names. One of these was Mithra.” (Canney: pg 244)

The swastika represented the all seeing eye of the sun

ShambhallahSunHeka

Sungazing is central to Shambhallah spiritual practice. It activates the 3rd eye, empowers the body and balances life by filling it with buoyant joy.

Tibetan terms:

  • khra hrig: wide open eyes…
  • chu bur mig: physical eyes…
  • che re bltas: looking directly…
  • 
lta stang: gaze…
  • spyan: eyes…
  • mig khra hrig ge: piercing eyes…
  • 
zur mig blta: flirtatious eyes…
  • 
gzi: onyx stone with eyes…
  • lha yi mig: divine eye…

All these words are so similar to Olmo Lung Rig, the Tibetan word for Shambhallah.

“Listen while you keep motionless command of your organs of sense. Even the eyelids may not be moved.” (Francke: 1950..pg 181)…

Shambhallah is the Camelot of the East.
It has been the home to fabled noble kings, unbeatable chivalrous heroes, astounding magicians, a 20,000-year-old history and a the promise of a better future.

It is the place that existed before the last great cataclysm and still exists today. It sent its seeds of science, ethics and magick to the rest of the world. The rest of the world would send their future kings and priests there to be educated for their new responsibilities. It now is possible to prove that trade in philosophy from the east affected the traditions of many other parts of the globe. Egypt, Assyria, India, Greece, British Isles, and Australia all have legends in their indigenous traditions that link them with a place fitting the description of Shambhallah. Pythagoras and Apollonius studied there, bringing back the teachings, ethics, art, mathematics and sciences that inspired the golden age of Greece and has thus affected western civilisation forever.

“In Shinto, the ancestors watch their descendants with their spirit eyes.”..(Jinja:1958..pg 24)…

The word exists in both Hindu and Buddhist legends. This centre leans more to the older Hindu teachings. The Buddhist say that Shambhallah was conquered and the 20,000 wise magick practising priests were exiled rather than convert to Buddhism. These priests were famous for their study of and control of the cycles of time. Magicians that could alter time! Though the Buddhists like to call this “the ancient nameless religion’ of Tibet, their documents preserve it name. Their belief system called “Surayah,” which means “sun-time.” Abaris, friend to Pythagoras also worshiped this deity. Colloquially the practise is called Dong-ba, or “doing magick” in Tibet. These priests are called Eihoah to this day by the Sherpas who watch the flocks. This coincidental sounding name makes me wonder whom it was that Moses really met whilst tending sheep when he was wandering in the eastern mountains? Down to this day, these priests wear capes made out of feathers that when it is thrown back makes them look like they have great angelic wings. They carry a magickal dart called a phur-ba as their main ritual tool and had magick phrases they counted out on beads. These were the scholars of the Alti-Himalayan region. Unlike our scholars today, these priests could not specialise in one thing they had to be good all-rounders. They had to master astronomy, chronology, astrology, law, weather patterns, mathematics, science, psychology, history, as well as ritual, psychic abilities called Samadhi techniques and other esoteria were basic requirements. We teach these things and more in our Shambhallah Mystery School.

“When we see with our eyes in the state of contemplation what we are really seeing is our own wisdom.” (Wangyal: 1993..pg 89)…


 

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